Hidden Pair

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Hidden Pair
If two cells in a group contain an identical pair of candidates and no other cells in that group contain those two candidates, then other candidates in those two cells can be excluded.

In the example below, the candidates 7 and 8 are located in two highlighted cells of a row, and therefore form a pair. All candidates except 7 and 8 can be excluded from these two cells as one cell must be the 7 while the other must be the 8.
Hidden Pair
Hidden Triple
If three cells in a group contain an identical triple of candidates and no other cells in that group contain those three candidates, then other candidates in those three cells can be excluded.

In the example below, the candidates 4, 5 and 9 are located in three highlighted cells of a row, and therefore form a triple. We do not yet know the values of the cells, but we do know that these cells must be a 4, a 5 or a 9. All candidates except 4, 5 and 9 can be excluded from these three cells. Hidden triples are very hard to spot, but fortunately they're rarely required to solve a puzzle. Usually the Hidden Triple is not required, since the same effect is achieved by using the Naked Pair or Naked Triple.
Hidden Triple